No-Shave March Raises $640 for Cancer Care Packages

No-Shave March Raises $640 for Cancer Care Packages

The end of March marks the end of facial hair for students at NDA.

A prominent rule at NDA is that male students must have a clean-shaven face, but at the beginning of March they were given the choice to buy a $20 pin to grow out their facial hair for the month.

“It’s a fun event and helps raise money for cancer,” said Andrew Delvoye on why he decided to participate in the event.

The school had 32 participants and raised $640. 

At the end of March, participants were asked to take a picture of their facial hair in the office.

The pictures were put in a google form for students to cast their vote in categories such as “most creative beard.”

No Shave March originally started as a way to raise money for the shavees of the St. Baldrick’s event.

This year, the money is being used to create care packages for cancer patients in the area that include items like tie blankets, coloring books, stress balls and a jar of inspirational quotes.

Cancer affects 1.6 million people in the U.S. alone. A common treatment for cancer is chemotherapy, which can often result in hair loss in patients. An event like this is a way to show solidarity for all those affected.

One of NDA’s very own, Mrs. Rickards, understands what these patients are going through from her own battle with breast cancer.

“I was diagnosed with breast cancer 10 years ago when our children were in grade school and just 2 months after my mother had completed treatment for breast cancer. The outpouring of help and support we received from our family, our St. Matthew School family and our dear friends was overwhelming,” said Rickards.

Rickards explained that during that time she learned she is stronger than she thought and that she saw how much people cared and genuinely wanted to help.

“I want other cancer patients to feel that same love and support that I received which is why No Shave March and the Cancer Care Packages are so important.”

This article originally appeared in The Tritonian.

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